NH3, Food Security, and The Transition to Fossil Fuel Free

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NH3 Fuel Association

Keynote Speech 2014

Alex Lightman, Chairman, GINET and Everblaze
11th Annual NH3 Fuel Conference, September 22, 2014

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Life-cycle greenhouse gas and energy balance of community-scale wind powered ammonia production

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NH3 Fuel Association

Joel Tallaksen* (1), Fredric Bauer (2), Christian Hulteberg (2), Michael Reese (1), and Serina Ahlgren (3)
(1) West Central Research & Outreach Center, University of Minnesota
(2) Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Sweden,
(3) Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

11th Annual NH3 Fuel Conference, September 23, 2014

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Hydrogen from Ammonia breakthrough for car fuels

Hydrogen breakthrough could be a game-changer for the future of car fuels

Jun 24, 2014 by Marion O’sullivan

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-hydrogen-breakthrough-game-changer-future-car.html#jCp

1st published June 24 2014    by Marion O’sullivan

Nature's Hydrogen TankUK researchers today announced what they believe to be a game changer in the use of hydrogen as a “green” fuel. Continue reading “Hydrogen from Ammonia breakthrough for car fuels”

Fill her up… with ammonia! NH3 fuel is carbon-free

Looking to the past for the fuel of the future

natures-hydrogen-tank

IN NOVEMBER 1942, Belgium’s public bus system ground to a halt, crippled by a wartime shortage of diesel.

The standstill caused chaos. Engineers at the country’s public transport company got to work and by April 1943 the service was up and running again. They had adapted about 100 buses to run on an alternative fuel – liquid ammonia, pumped into tanks on the buses’ roofs.

The experiment was short-lived, but it proved the point that ammonia – plus a small amount of coal gas to help combustion – could be used as a transport fuel.

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Seventy years later, ammonia may be ready to ride to the rescue again. As a fuel it has a number of attractive attributes. It doesn’t release carbon when burned, is relatively easy to store and transport, and could take advantage of an existing infrastructure of storage tanks, transport ships and pipelines.

These attributes give ammonia an edge over hydrogen, long touted as the fuel of the future in a hypothetical “hydrogen economy”. It also has certain advantages over electricity, which has storage problems of its own.

Ammonia isn’t a panacea. Conventional production consumes a lot of energy, the infrastructure is still dwarfed by that for petroleum, and engines would need to be modified to run on pure ammonia (like Belgium’s buses, most experimental vehicles need some conventional fuel mixed in with the ammonia).

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But interest is growing in new production processes that use renewable energy (see “Grab ammonia out of thin air for fuel of the future“). If successful they could form the seeds of a low-carbon “ammonia economy” – which would actually be a hydrogen economy of sorts, with ammonia acting as the storage medium for hydrogen.

The road to a low-carbon future won’t be straightforward, and it seems certain that we will need a range of energy sources to arrive there in good time.

Ammonia ought to be part of the mix.

This article appeared in print under the headline “Fill her up… with ammonia”

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much more info here

https://co2freefuelexistsnow.wordpress.com/

The Free

Looking to the past for the fuel of the future

natures-hydrogen-tank

IN NOVEMBER 1942, Belgium’s public bus system ground to a halt, crippled by a wartime shortage of diesel.

The standstill caused chaos. Engineers at the country’s public transport company got to work and by April 1943 the service was up and running again. They had adapted about 100 buses to run on an alternative fuel – liquid ammonia, pumped into tanks on the buses’ roofs.

The experiment was short-lived, but it proved the point that ammonia – plus a small amount of coal gas to help combustion – could be used as a transport fuel.

amveh-x250

Seventy years later, ammonia may be ready to ride to the rescue again. As a fuel it has a number of attractive attributes. It doesn’t release carbon when burned, is relatively easy to store and transport, and could take advantage of an existing infrastructure…

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Ammonia fuel.. CO2 and pollution FREE.. Wikipedia

Ammonia was used during World War II to power buses in Belgium, and in engine and solar energy applications prior to 1900. Liquid ammonia also fuelled the Reaction Motors XLR99 rocket engine, that powered the X-15 hypersonic research aircraft. Although not as powerful as other fuels, it left no soot in the reusable rocket engine and its density approximately matches the density of the oxidizer, liquid oxygen, which simplified the aircraft’s design.

The X-15 aircraft used ammonia as one component fuel of its rocket engine

Ammonia has been proposed as a practical alternative to fossil fuel for internal combustion engines.[49] The calorific value of ammonia is 22.5 MJ/kg (9690 BTU/lb), which is about half that of diesel. In a normal engine, in which the water vapour is not condensed, the calorific value of ammonia will be about 21% less than this figure. It can be used in existing engines with only minor modifications to carburettors/injectors. Continue reading “Ammonia fuel.. CO2 and pollution FREE.. Wikipedia”

Korean ammonia NH3 car to Slash CO2 and Toxic Air

The Free

The AmVeh – an ammonia fueled car from South Korea

South Korean researchers have successfully road-tested a dual fuel passenger car that runs on a mixture of ammonia and gasoline. It is called the AmVeh and was developed by members of the Ammonia Research Group at the Korean Institute forEnergy Research (KIER
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Ammonia-gasoline dual fuel, and pure ammonia engines

The prototype vehicle uses a fuel ratio of 70% ammonia to 30% gasoline to power a spark ignition engine. As ammonia contains no carbon, this fuel ratio results in a corresponding 70% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, compared to pure gasoline.

The AmVeh team is now focused on improving the fuel system and the exhaust after-treatment system. Once these are optimized, they aim to develop an engine system that runs on ammonia alone, without any support from gasoline. The emissions from this carbon-free vehicle would be pure water and…

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